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Undue Influence, Family run Companies and Personal Guarantees by Relatives-Directors: Convergence of English and Scottish Laws? - Nelson Enonchong

New York building

Location:

Virtual Event

Date/time

Wed 8 December 2021
17:30-19:00

The Edinburgh Centre for Commercial Law welcomes Prof Nelson Enonchong, Barber Prof of Commercial Law, University of Birmingham and barrister and arbitrator at No5 Chambers.

 

Undue Influence, Family run Companies and Personal Guarantees by Relatives-Directors: Convergence of English and Scottish Laws?

 

About the speaker
Professor Enonchong is the author of three major practitioner works in the field of banking and commercial law. He has advised in a number of complex international commercial disputes and has acted as an arbitrator in international commercial arbitrations. Professor Nelson Enonchong read law at the University of Yaounde and Jesus College, Cambridge. He was a lecturer and Reader in Law at the University of Leicester before joining the University of Birmingham as Barber Professor of Law in 2001

Professor Enonchong’s principal research interests are in the fields of Contract/Commercial Law, International Trade and Finance, Private International law and Comparative law. He is the author of several influential publications in these areas.

The third edition of his leading work on Duress, Undue Influence and Unconscionable Dealing (2019) has recently been published by Sweet & Maxwell. The book, which has been relied upon by courts in the UK and other jurisdictions such as Australia, Canada, Hong Kong and Singapore, remains a primary point of reference on these topics.

His monograph on The Independence Principle of Letters of Credit and Demand Guarantees was published by Oxford University Press in 2011. It examines the nature and scope of the cardinal principle of autonomy of letters of credit and demand guarantees. It considers the challenges presented by the principle and explores the extent to which exceptions to the principle should be recognised in order address the problem of abusive demands for payment. This work has been cited by courts in the UK and other countries such as Australia and Singapore.

His book on Illegal Transactions was published by Lloyd’s of London Press in 1998. It is the first book to be published in the UK on this notoriously difficult subject. This work has been relied upon by courts in the UK and other countries such as Australia, Kenya, Nigeria and Singapore.

 

This event is free and open to all but registration is required (link below).

 

Image credit: Photo by Erol Ahmed on Unsplash

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