Reader in Law

Esq, BA, LLB, LLM, PhD, FHEA
View my full research profile

Biography

Shawn Harmon is a former practitioner and litigator who now specialises in medical law, human rights law, and bioethics, and their overlapping governance of medical practices, life sciences innovation, and health technologies commercialisation. His interest in interdisciplinary and empirical research has led to projects and publications relating to regulation and moral values in multiple contexts, the cooperation of humanities and the arts in understanding contemporary ethical issues, and in innovative ways to communicate science and academic understandings.

Shawn’s research has been funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, the Arts and Humanities Research Council, the Wellcome Trust, the EU's Innovative Medicines Initiative, and the University of Edinburgh's Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities, Challenge Investment Fund, and Moray Fund. His research has been published in many international journals, including peer-reviewed publications from Europe, the UK and Canada.

Shawn has been a Research Fellow and a Lecturer in Regulation & Risk, and is now a Reader in Law. He is co-founder and Deputy Director of the J Kenyon Mason Institute for Medicine, Life Sciences and the Law, an interdisciplinary research institute located within the School of Law. He is Joint Editor-in-Chief of Medical Law International and former Editor-in-Chief of SCRIPTed – A Journal of Law, Technology & Society.

Shawn teaches a range of Masters level courses, which address, inter alia, international public health and ethics, life sciences regulation, the commercialisation of health research, care practices and the law, and more. He is also a Tutor on the ‘Medical Law & Ethics’ Continuing Professional Development programme.

Shawn is interested in supervising doctoral candidates in the areas of global health justice, health technologies governance, and the convergence of the arts and humanities for better understanding contemporary social and bioethical problems.

Courses Taught

Contemporary Issues in Medical Jurisprudence (Honours)

Risk Society and Regulatory Frameworks (10 crdts) (LLM) (Course Organiser)

PhD Supervisees

Edward Dove  'Promoting Health Research and Protecting Participants? The Impact of 'Next-Generation' Health Research Regulation on Research Ethics Committees'

Laura Downey  'Technological Challenges to Legal Norms in Health Care'

Nevena Kostova  'The Relationship between Copyright, Creators' Organisations and Business Models'

Journal Articles

Shawn H.E. Harmon, Charlotte Waelde, Sarah Whatley 'Disabled Dance: Grounding the Practice in the Law of 'Cultural Heritage'' (2014) Web Journal of Current Legal Issues 37020(3)
Abstract: The arts, including dance, hold great importance in society. The InVisible Difference project seeks to extend thinking and alter practice around the making, status, ownership, and value of work by contemporary dance choreographers, focusing on that made and performed by differently-abled individuals. This paper considers the position of disabled dance in law and society by asking the overarching question: Is disabled dance a part of our 'cultural heritage'? This is an important question because it will, or ought to, have both legal and social consequences for this art-form moving forward. First, we examine the legal definition of 'cultural heritage' as it has developed in international human rights law and practice. Second, we consider whether disabled dance does or could fit into that definition and therefore claim the protections and potential benefits of that capture. Finally, we consider what might be done under the directive legal instruments that bear on this setting, focusing on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (2006).

Shawn H.E. Harmon, Kuan-Hsun Chen 'Medical Research Data-Sharing: The 'Public Good' and Vulnerable Groups' (2012) Medical Law Review 20 516-39
Abstract: One of the moral tests of governments is how they treat those in the twilight of life (the elderly). As such, it is important not only to take care of the needs of the elderly, but also to place their reality in the forefront of deliberations and actions. Now that we are in the so-called century of biology, we must ensure that the newly transformed and increasingly relied on biosciences not only respond to the needs of the elderly but also reflect the reality of the elderly. While many arguments can be made in support of increased data-sharing in biomedical research (and indeed within and across healthcare systems more generally), there are some persuasive age-based arguments that might serve to encourage science regulators, through both funding structures and the law, to fundamentally reshape the research environment so as to enhance its potential to achieve public goods such as improved health and more effective healthcare systems. In this paper, after noting the new research model arising from population genomics, with its intense data needs, we advance three age-based arguments, in favour of increased and improved data-sharing, and we conclude with some brief observations about how increased data-sharing might be achieved.

Shawn H.E. Harmon, Aisling McMahon 'Banking (On) the Brain: A Report on the Legal and Regulatory Concerns' (2012) SCRIPTed 9 376-83
Abstract: 10.2966/scrip.090312.376

Shawn H.E. Harmon, Gill Haddow 'Banking (on) the Brain: The Neurological in Culture, Law and Science' (2012) Medical Law International 12(2) 79-91
Abstract: DOI: 10.1177/0968533212471176

Graeme Laurie, Shawn H.E. Harmon, Fabiana Arzuaga 'Foresighting Futures: Law, New Technologies and the Challenges of Regulating for Uncertainty' (2012) Law, Innovation and Technology 4 1-33
Abstract: This paper is concerned with making law more effective in its social operation and in its relationship with dynamic, complex and uncertain science. It explores how we might better regulate by considering the concept and role of 'legal foresighting'. It argues that legal foresighting is eminently justifiable and needs to be expanded, enhanced, and vastly improved. It offers a framework for performing legal foresighting in the face of new and emerging technologies, drawing in particular on the authors' experience in the bioscience and biotechnologies context.

Shawn H.E. Harmon, Shang-Yun Yen, Shu-Mei Tang 'Invigorating 'Nanoethics': Recommendations for Improving Deliberations in Taiwan and Beyond' (2011) NanoEthics 5 309-18
Abstract: Nanotechnology is the new(est) star in the high technologies sky. While nanotechnologies remain technologies of promise and potential, a growing number of nano-materials and nano-particle-reliant products are being produced. And although a growing number of academic, policy and industry reports are exploring nanotechnologies, there are very few genuine ethical assessments of nanotechnologies as they exist and might evolve in the coming years. Many questions have yet to be answered about the nature, development, and social and commercial deployment of nanotechnologies and what that means for the human condition and the preservation of our core values. We argue that the early and potentially risky nature of this interdisciplinary science does not justify a blinkered focus on risk assessment and management to the detriment of deep and ranging ethical evaluations. Much improved ethics evaluations must be undertaken, particularly in Taiwan where very little has happened despite grand expectations for, and funding of, the science. In this paper, we uncover the development imperatives for nanotechnologies, demonstrate the paucity of genuine nanoethics exercises, outline key questions for stakeholders undertaking nanoethisc exercises to consider, and we articulate some preliminary actions for Taiwan (and other similarly situated jurisdictions) to take.

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'Ambition and Ambivalence: Encouraging a Science Culture in Argentina Through Engagement and Regulatory Reform' (2011) Studies in Ethics, Law and Technology 1-265
Abstract: See http://www.bepress.com/selt/vol5/iss1/art1/.

Shawn H.E. Harmon, Na-Kyoung Kim 'Acceptance, Modification and Rejection of Paternalism in Korean Medical Law' (2010) Development & Reproduction 14(2) pp143-154

Shawn H.E. Harmon, Chunshui Wang and Jing Bai 'Organ Transplantation in China and Beyond: Addressing the 'Access Gap'' (2010) Medical Law International 191-21610(3)

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'Body Blow: Mature Minors and the Supreme Court of Canada's Decision in AC v. Manitoba (Director of Child & Family Services)' (2010) McGill Journal of Law and Health 83-964

Shawn H.E. Harmon, Graeme Laurie 'Yearworth v. North Bristol NHS Trust: Property, Principles, Precedents and Paradigms' (2010) Cambridge Law Journal 69 476-93

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'Yearworth v. North Bristol NHS Trust: A Property Case of Uncertain Significance' (2010) Medicine, Health Care & Philosophy 343-350

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'Consent and Conflict in Medico-Legal Decision-Making at the End of Life: A Critical Issue in the Canadian Context' (2010) University of New Brunswick Law Journal 208-229 60

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'Regulation of Stem Cell and Regenerative Science: Stakeholder Opinions, Plurality and Actor Space in the Argentine Social/Science Setting' (2010) Law, Innovation and Technology 2(1) pp 95-114
Abstract: This paper articulates in broad terms a model bioscience environment and its primary constituent parts, which include bioscience policy and regulation, technology deployment and stakeholder engagement, and science innovation systems. Then, having reference to empirical data generated by the GET: Social Values Project, it offers an explanation of how the Argentine environment departs from that ideal model. Finally, focusing on one constituent part of the environment - the policy and regulatory space - it reports on Argentine stakeholder opinions and desires and what these mean for the potential to adopt facilitative regulation in Argentina. It concludes that the Argentine scientific environment is sub-optimal and poorly equipped to deal effectively and positively with the plurality of ideas that people have for both the trajectory of science and its regulation. It ends with a call for further research which broadens the evidence base and thereby facilitates the improvement of the social/science environment and its constituent parts.

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'New Technologies and Moral Duties: Valuing the Person as a Means to an End' (2009) Science as Culture 18(4) 505-510

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'Of Plants and People: Why Do We Care About Dignity?' (2009) EMBO Reports 1-3 10(9)

Shawn H.E. Harmon, Ann Bruce 'Discursive Typologies and Moral Values in Stem Cell Politics, Regulation and Commercialisation: Some Preliminary Observations' (2009) Journal of International Biotechnology Law 61-666(2)
Abstract: Great importance is attached to, and great controversy surrounds, biotechnology generally and stem cell research more specifically, particularly human embryonic stem cell research. Given its position at the vanguard of innovations in theoretical and applied human healthcare science, and as a source of political conflict and achievement, it is useful to examine attitudes toward, and actions around, embryonic stem cell research. This article conceives of three discursive typologies and explores their deployment in three different settings or sites in the life or progress of embryonic stem cell research, namely, the political (determining legal boundaries), the hybrid (identifying and enforcing boundaries for laboratory research), and the administrative (enforcing boundaries in the commercial context), the intention being to determine whether these typologies are consistent and what moral values their use supports. This article concludes that the typologies are deployed to varying degrees in the different sites, and with varying degrees of success. Although this might be expected, and not altogether unwarranted, given the different roles and objectives of the primary institutions at each site, the current prevalence of the typologies suggests that these institutions might not be operating optimally from the democracy enhancement and transparency points of view.

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'Semantic, Pedantic or Paradigm Shift? Recruitment, Retention and Property in Modern Population Biobanking' (2009) European Journal of Health Law vol 16(1) pp 27-33

Shawn H.E. Harmon, Na-Kyoung Kim 'Medical Research Governance in Korea: The New Bioethics and Biosafety Amendment Bill or 'Inertia Reiterated' (2008) SCRIPTed 5(3) pp575-582

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'International Public Health Law: Not so much WHO as why, and not enough WHO and why not?' (2008) Medicine, Health Care & Philosophy

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'Ethical Rhetoric: Genomics and the Moral Content of UNESCO's 'Universal' Declarations' (2008) Journal of Medical Ethics vol 34(11) pp e24

Shawn H.E. Harmon, Na-kyoung Kim 'A Tale of Two Standards: Drift and Inertia in Modern Korean Medical Law' (2008) SCRIPTed vol 5(2) pp 267-293

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'Biotechnology Innovation and Patenting in the Developing World: China - A Giant Among Nations?' (2007) ICFAI Journal of Intellectual Property Rights 72-8512
Abstract: The mantra of pro-patenting stakeholders is that intellectual property rights, and in particular patent rights, promote innovation. But can this claim be supported? And is it always true? This article analyses the claim within the context of the developing world and healthcare settings. Having articulated the special case that medical patents represent in the developing world, it goes on to consider the patent regime in China, outlining the content of the modern Chinese patent law with a view to assessing how it reflects China's economic and healthcare situation, and identifying what other developing countries might take from it.

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'Solidarity: A (New) Ethic for Global Health Policy' (2006) Health Care Analysis 215-23614(4)
Abstract: This article explores solidarity as an ethical concept underpinning rules in the global health context. First, it considers the theoretical conceptualisation of the value and some specific duties it supports (ie: its expression in the broadest sense and its derivative action-guiding duties). Second, it considers the manifestation of solidarity in two international regulatory instruments. It concludes that, although solidarity is represented in these instruments, it is often incidental. This fact, their emphasis on other values and their internal weaknesses diminishes the action-guiding impact of the solidarity rules. The global health and human subject research scene needs a completely new instrument specifically directed at means by which solidarity can be achieved, and a reformed infrastructure dedicated to realising that value.

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'From Engagement to Re-Engagement: The Expression of Moral Values in Patenting Proceedings, Present and Future' (2006) European Law Review vol 31(5) pp 642-666

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'The Recommendation on Research on Biological Materials of Human Origin: Another Brick in the Wall' (2006) European Journal of Health Law vol 13(3) pp 293-310

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'A Penny For Your Thoughts, A Pound For Your Flesh: Implications of Recognizing Property in Human Body Parts' (2006) Medical Law International vol 7(4) pp 329-354

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'The Significance of UNESCO's Universal Declaration on the Human Genome and Human Rights' (2005) SCRIPTed vol 21 pp 18-47

Shawn H.E. Harmon, G. Haddow, A. Bruce, J. Calvert, W. Marsden 'Not Human Enough to be 'Human' and Not Animal Enough to be 'Animal': The Case of the HFEA, Admixed Embryos and Xenotransplantation' (0) New Genetics & Society

Chapters

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'Not Foresighting and Not Answering: Using Graphic Fiction to Interrogate Social and Regulatory Issues in Biomedicine' in Thomas Giddens (eds) Graphic Justice (Routledge, 2015) 71-88

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'Genetics: Legal Issues' in James Wright (eds) International Encyclopaedia of the Social and Behavioural Sciences (Elsevier Oxford, 2015)

Graeme Laurie, Shawn H.E. Harmon 'Through the Thicket and Across the Divide: Successfully Navigating the Regulatory Landscape in Life Sciences Research' in Emilie Cloatre (eds) Knowledge, Technology and Law (Routledge, 2014) 121-136

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'Motivating Values and Regulatory Models for Emerging Technologies: Stem Cell Research Regulation in Argentina and the United Kingdom' in M. Freeman (eds) Law and Bioethics: Current Legal Issues 2008 (Oxford University Press, 2008) pp. 147-176

Shawn H.E. Harmon, R. Gertz & G. Pradella 'Ethico-Legal Issues in Genetics' in A. Wright & N. Hastie (eds) (eds) Genes and Common Disease: Genetics in Modern Medicine (Cambridge University Press, 2007) pp. 176-198

Notes and Reviews

Nayha Sethi, Shawn H.E. Harmon 'Preserving Life and Facilitating Death: What Role for Government After Haas v Switzerland?' (2011) European Journal of Health Law p 355-364

Working Papers

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'Ethical Rhetoric: Genomics and the Moral Content of UNESCO's 'Universal' Declarations', Edinburgh Law School Working Paper Series, 2011/27 (SSRN, 2011) [Download]
Abstract: Genomic research is an expanding and subversive field, leaking into various others, from environmental protection to food production to healthcare delivery, and in doing so, it is reshaping our relationship with them. The international community has issued various declaratory instruments aimed at the human genome and genomic research. These soft law instruments stress the special nature of genomics and our genetic heritage, and attempt to set limits on our activities with respect to same, as informed by the human rights paradigm. This paper examines the primary thrust and, more importantly, the joint value position of the Universal Declaration on the Human Genome and Human Rights and the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights, concluding that, though important legal instruments from the human rights paradigm, these instruments, or rather the values contained therein, must find a more influential hard law voice and a broader policy environment.

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'Solidarity: A (New) Ethic for Global Health Policy', Edinburgh Law School Working Paper Series, 2011/28 (SSRN, 2011) [Download]
Abstract: This article explores solidarity as an ethical concept underpinning rules in the global health context. First, it considers the theoretical conceptualisation of the value and some specific duties it supports (ie: its expression in the broadest sense and its derivative action-guiding duties). Second, it considers the manifestation of solidarity in two international regulatory instruments. It concludes that, although solidarity is represented in these instruments, it is often incidental. This fact, their emphasis on other values and their internal weaknesses diminishes the action-guiding impact of the solidarity rules. The global health and human subject research scene needs a completely new instrument specifically directed at means by which solidarity can be achieved, and a reformed infrastructure dedicated to realising that value.

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'From Engagement to Re-Engagement: The expression of moral values in European patent proceedings, present and future', Edinburgh Law School Working Paper Series, 2011/29 (SSRN, 2011) [Download]
Abstract: In the regulation of new technologies, publics are often left questioning the value of their contribution to the final regulatory content, or feeling excluded from the regulation-making loop altogether. Dissatisfaction with upstream participation naturally results in stakeholders looking further downstream for influence. In the biotechnology arena, patent proceedings represent a participatory tool for stakeholders who may have been left out of or failed to achieve their goals upstream. Although they may have a reduced capability for shifting paradigms or shaping policy formulation, downstream expressions of values can be lively, and the acceptance or rejection of stakeholder positions by downstream regulators can be of great significance. Here the use of the morality provision in EPO proceedings is contrasted as between earlier and more recent decisions. It suggests which values have been given expression in this forum, how they have changed over time and how a wider pool of values might be incorporated into the existing system.

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'A Penny for Your Thoughts, a Pound for Your Flesh: Implications of recognizing property rights in our own excised body parts', Edinburgh Law School Working Paper Series, 2011/30 (SSRN, 2011) [Download]
Abstract: The implications of recognizing property in our own excised body parts are vast and far reaching, involving ethical, legal and practical issues that cut across many aspects of modern social intercourse and legal regulation. Arguments both for and against such recognition are well rehearsed; enough has been written to fill a small library, or at least a large bookshelf. A significant portion of the work considers the role and impact of such recognition on human dignity. Indeed, given the special status accorded the human body, it is impossible to avoid human dignity and its interaction with the various choices presented by the adoption of a property model. However, reference to this general ethical value is of little assistance. Here, the ethical foundation of a property model is considered within the context of medical ethical four principles, namely autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice. If such a model promotes these principles, it can be ethically defended. The primary implication of recognizing property in our own excised body parts - the emergence of transactions relating to such parts as between originators and third parties - is assessed against these principles and found to be ethically defensible. In the course of that assessment, many of the derivative implications of adopting such a system (procurement, risk, allocation) are discussed. The necessary alterations to or limitations of the more purely property law principles are also briefly considered, namely issues of title, transfer, valuation and quality. The paper concludes that a property model is ethically supported and legally manageable, and, despite the near impossibility of seeing it come to fruition, it may be the only way to truly engage potential "donors" and recognize in them the same value and rights currently enjoyed by other actors in the body part industry.

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'Semantic, Pedantic or Paradigm Shift? Recruitment, Retention and Property in Modern Population Biobanking', Edinburgh Law School Working Paper Series, 2011/31 (SSRN, 2011) [Download]
Abstract: Evolving uses of human biological material, including their collection and retention in biobanks and their distribution to diverse projects, are sites of great tension from the human rights perspective. In the medical-legal setting, these rights are often protected and realised through consent practices. In the biobank setting, there endures a widely shared concern over consent, and the many divergent ways it is fashioned and deployed. This article reconsiders consent in the biobank setting, first, addressing the theoretical foundation of consent and its deployment in the broader medical context, second, examining the nature of biobanks and the uncomfortable position of consent therein, and finally, offering a means of approaching recruitment and retention in the biobank setting which is sensitive to originator interests, including human dignity, doing so within the rubric of a property model.

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'Yearworth v. North Bristol NHS Trust: A property/medical case of uncertain significance?', Edinburgh Law School Working Paper Series, 2011/32 (SSRN, 2011) [Download]
Abstract: It has long been the position in law that, subject to some minor but important exceptions, property cannot be held in the human body, whether living or dead. In the recent case of Yearworth and Others v North Bristol NHS Trust, however, the Court of Appeal for England and Wales revisited the property debate and threw into doubt a number of doctrines with respect to property and the body. This brief article analyses Yearworth, (1) reviewing the facts and the Court's decision with respect to the originators' proprietary and contractual interests in their body and bodily products, (2) considering the significance of relying on property and its use a legal metaphor, (3) questioning the scope of the property right created, and (4) querying whether an alternate conceptual approach to extending rights and a remedy was warranted. It concludes that, while Yearworth engages with, and impacts on, important theoretical and practical issues - from legal, healthcare and research perspectives - it does not offer a great deal of guidance and, for that reason, its precedential significance is in doubt.

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'Emerging Technologies and Developing Countries: Stem Cell Research (and Cloning) Regulation and Argentina', Edinburgh Law School Working Paper Series, 2011/33 (SSRN, 2011) [Download]
Abstract: Innovation is the mantra of the modern, knowledge-based political-economy, and biotech innovation is one of the central pillars of the new 'innovation society'. Healthcare innovation - a key component of the biotech stream of innovation - is both an integral part of the innovation society and is reshaping that society. An important facet of healthcare innovation is stem cell research (SCR). This paper explores the moral controversy surrounding human embryonic SCR (hESCR) and assesses its legal position in Argentina. An analysis of hESCR is important/timely because it is a much-hyped pursuit to which much hope is attached, and, simultaneously, a much-maligned pursuit to which much antipathy is directed. It is also the site of mammoth bioethical clashes around unique issues relating to (1) the wellbeing of the embryo, the harvesting of which currently requires its destruction, and (2) the wellbeing of the collective, which is notionally threatened by certain processes associated with hESCR, most notably cloning, or 'somatic cell nuclear transfer'. An analysis of hESCR (and SCR more generally) in Argentina is important/timely because Argentina is a southern, economically fragile, developing country that is actively pursuing regenerative medicine and SC solutions to health problems. Indeed, Argentina is one of a handful of developing countries taking steps to build a competitive domestic market.

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'A Tale of Two Standards: Drift and Inertia in Modern Korean Medical Law', Edinburgh Law School Working Paper Series (SSRN, 2009) [Download]
Abstract: Like all nations, the national character of Korea has been shaped by a variety of geographic and historical factors. Some of the characteristics that have emerged from Korea's experience are 'familism' and 'scientism', both of which have had, and are having, a fundamental impact on the content and application of medical law. These phenomena, combined with recent events both inside Korea (eg: a physicians' strike (2000) and the more important Hwang scandal (2005)) and outwith (eg: the spread of 'informed consent' (1980s), the commencement of the Human Genome Project (1990), and the cloning of Dolly the Sheep (1997)), have contributed to a flurry of recent governance activity in Korea. Given the latest legislative proposals offered, we explore two areas of Korean medical law with a view to exposing their trajectories. First, we examine the governance of the patient-physician relationship in the clinical setting, paying particular attention to consent and to liability. Second, we examine the legal-ethical control of biotech research in the medical research setting, paying particular attention to consent, quality control and limits. We conclude that these two arenas appear to be traveling down two dramatically different (if not divergent) roads; in the case of the former, drifting away from traditional practices, and in the case of the latter, remaining mired in imbalance and dominated by antithetical interests.

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'A Tale of Two Standards: Drift and Inertia in Modern Korean Medical Law', Edinburgh Law School Working Paper Series, 2009/15 (SSRN, 2009) [Download]
Abstract: Like all nations, the national character of Korea has been shaped by a variety of geographic and historical factors. Some of the characteristics that have emerged from Korea's experience are 'familism' and 'scientism', both of which have had, and are having, a fundamental impact on the content and application of medical law. These phenomena, combined with recent events both inside Korea (eg: a physicians' strike (2000) and the more important Hwang scandal (2005)) and outwith (eg: the spread of 'informed consent' (1980s), the commencement of the Human Genome Project (1990), and the cloning of Dolly the Sheep (1997)), have contributed to a flurry of recent governance activity in Korea. Given the latest legislative proposals offered, we explore two areas of Korean medical law with a view to exposing their trajectories. First, we examine the governance of the patient-physician relationship in the clinical setting, paying particular attention to consent and to liability. Second, we examine the legal-ethical control of biotech research in the medical research setting, paying particular attention to consent, quality control and limits. We conclude that these two arenas appear to be traveling down two dramatically different (if not divergent) roads; in the case of the former, drifting away from traditional practices, and in the case of the latter, remaining mired in imbalance and dominated by antithetical interests.

Papers and Presentations

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'Regulating Risks in Health and Brain Banking' presented at Critical Law Society Annual Conference, Canterbury, 2013

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'Brain Banking: Ethical Issues & Legal Solutions' presented at WCPG World Congress, Hamburg, 2012

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'Brain Banking: Ethical Issues & Legal Solutions' presented at 51st Annual Meeting of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP), Hollywood, FL, 2012

Shawn H.E. Harmon, Martyn Pickersgill 'The Manchurian Candidate: Social and Ethical Reflections' presented at Biomedical Ethics Film Festival, Filmhouse Cinema, Edinburgh, 2012

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'Stem Cell Research and Social Values: Evidence from Argentina' presented at Presentation at the NCKU Medical School, Tainan, Taiwan, 2010

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'UK Biobank: Fostering Public Trust Through Innovative Ethical Governance' presented at National Science Committee, ELSI Group, Taipei, Taiwan, 2010

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'Stem Cell Research Regulation: Evidence from Argentina' presented at Advisory Commission on Regenerative Medicine and Cellular Therapies, Buenos Aires, 2010

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'Rights, Values, Research and Human Health: Evidence from Argentina' presented at 18th World Medical Law Congress, Zagreb, 2010

Shawn H.E. Harmon, Shang-Yung Yen 'Trust and Legitimacy in Taiwan Biobank: The Significance of Aboriginal Involvement' presented at Workshop for Biotech Policy and Public Communication in the Post-Genomic Era, Tainan, 2010

Wiebke Abel, Shawn H.E. Harmon 'Future Tech: Governance & Ethics in The Age Of Artificially Enhanced Man (Or 'Beware the ZombAIs At The Gate')' presented at Gikii 4, Institute for Information Law, Amsterdam, 2009

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'Measuring Arguments Around Genomic Innovation: Stem Cell Research and Argument Typologies' presented at "Mapping the Genomic Era: Measurements and Meanings" - 3rd Annual EGN Conference, Cardiff, 2009

Shawn H.E. Harmon 'Stem Cells, Bioethics, and Human Rights' presented at British Science Association Cafe Scientifique Series, Reading, 2009