Lecturer in Criminology

BA, MSc, PhD, FHEA, FRSA

Biography

Dr Richard Jones is Lecturer in Criminology, at the School of Law, University of Edinburgh, UK. He received his PhD from the University of Cambridge where he studied at the Institute of Criminology and Trinity Hall. He has published on topics including the electronic monitoring ('tagging') of offenders, access control, border controls, computer crime, penal populism, the media, airport security, the use of force in policing, and surveillance theory. His current research centres on security, surveillance, the sociology of punishment, theoretical criminology, cyber security and cybercrime.

From 2012-2015, and together with Professor Charles Raab, Richard was involved in the IRISS (Increasing Resilience in Surveillance Societies) Project, a large collaborative research project on the role of surveillance and resilience in democratic societies, funded by the European Commission under its FP7 framework.

Richard was involved in a number of successful outputs resulting from the IRISS project, including: a co-authored article ‘Questioning Surveillance’ in Computer Law & Security Review; conference/workshop presentations (with Charles Raab and Ivan Szekely) of a paper on resilience, democracy and surveillance; a short piece (with Charles Raab) on privacy design, published in Wright and Kreissl (eds) Surveillance in Europe (Routledge, 2015); two pieces (with Gemma Flynn) in Webster et al. (eds), published in Surveillance and Democracy in Europe (IOS Press, forthcoming); input to a Policy Brief on Data Protection and Subject Access Rights; and co-authorship of a Handbook on Increasing Resilience in a Surveillance Society (IRISS Project: EC Grant Agreement No. 290492, 2014).

Richard is interested in participating in Horizon 2020 research projects or similar on topics in the areas of surveillance, security, police use of new technologies, policing and social media, cybercrime, cyber security, resilience, counter-terrorism and national security. He is particularly interested in contributing to criminological research aspects of the above topics.

He is currently a member of the Editorial Board of the British Journal of Criminology, and was for 10 years a member of the International Advisory Board of the European Journal of Criminology. He has been an External Examiner for DPhil and MPhil degrees at the University of Oxford, a Guest seminar leader on the MPhil degree in Criminology at the University of Cambridge, an External Examiner for the MSc in Security and Risk Management degree at the University of Leicester, and an External Assessor for an MSc degree validation at Middlesex University. In 2009-2010 Richard was an Academic Visitor at the Centre for CriminologyUniversity of Oxford, and in 2003-4 he was a Visiting Academic at Sydney Law School, University of Sydney, Australia. Before joining the University of Edinburgh, Richard Jones was a Research Associate at the Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge. From 2012-2015 he was a member of the External Expert Group for the FIDUCIA FP7 project, part of which focused on cybercrime and its prevention within Europe.

Richard Jones is a member of the research group CRISP (Centre for Research into Information, Surveillance and Privacy), a collaborative group involving the universities of Edinburgh, Stirling and the Open University. At Edinburgh Law School he is the founder and Convenor of the Criminological Theory Group. Richard has a long-standing interest in computers and new technology. He tweets on the topics of surveillance, cybercrime, security, new technologies and the tech industry, and can be found on Twitter as DrRichardJ.

He has previously held the role of Programme Director of the MSc in Criminology and Criminal Justice degree, and teaches optional courses on Cybercrime, and on Surveillance and Security as part of that degree. (These optional courses are also available to those taking certain LLM or other MSc degrees at the University of Edinburgh.) Richard also welcomes enquiries from prospective PhD students, particularly in the areas of punishment, surveillance, security, cybercrime, technology, or social control, and especially where there is engagement with contemporary theoretical criminology. Among the Masters dissertation topics Dr Jones has  supervised include: cryptography and crime prevention; cybercrime, cyber-warfare and cyber-security; cybercrime, cyber-security and China; issues in intelligence agency reform; media reporting of crime; privacy and surveillance; airport security; and the privacy implications of data mining and data integration by Internet companies and law enforcement agencies.

He can be found on Linkedin: uk.linkedin.com/in/drrichardjones


Courses Taught

Criminology (Honours)

Cybercrime (MSc) (Course Organiser)

Global Crime and Insecurity (MSc)

Surveillance and Security (MSc) (Course Organiser)

Theoretical Criminology (MSc) (Course Organiser)

PhD Supervisees

Richard Bethune  'Profiling White-Collar Crime'

Jamie Buchan  'Restructuring Community Justice in Scotland, 2012-2017: Policy and Power Dynamics in the Penal Field'

Ben Collier  'Integrated Circuits: A Critical Development of Space and Agency in Criminological Theory of Cybercrime from Actor-Network Theory and Cyborg Theory Perspectives'

Shane Horgan  ''Cyber'-fears and Virtual Anxieties: Exploring public sensibilities towards the digital dimensions of crime and disorder'

Griff Williams  'Tripartite Communication under the Community Payback Order'

Edited Books

Richard Jones, Richard Sparks Punishment (Routledge, 2015)
Abstract: A thorny question faced by all civilized societies is what to do when people commit crime, and, in particular, how criminals are to be punished. Yet the nature of punishment, its justifications, aims, and effects has varied markedly throughout history and across and within cultures. These matters continue to be vigorously debated and frequently give rise to sharp divisions along lines of morality, politics, faith, and effectiveness. This new Routledge collection now brings together the major works on punishment, a central, important, and fascinating area of study, not just for the modern field of criminology but also for those in related disciplines. This four-volume collection enables users to consult influential texts, both old and new, and to trace the development of this important area of research and study.

Journal Articles

Richard Jones, Charles Raab, Ivan Szekely 'Surveillance and Resilience in Theory and Practice' (2015) Media and Communication 3(2) 21-41
Abstract: Surveillance is often used as a tool in resilience strategies towards the threat posed by terrorist attacks and other serious crime. "Resilience" is a contested term with varying and ambiguous meaning in governmental, business and social discourses, and it is not clear how it relates to other terms that characterise processes or states of being. Resilience is often assumed to have positive connotations, but critics view it with great suspicion, regarding it as a neo- liberal governmental strategy. However, we argue that surveillance, introduced in the name of greater security, may itself erode social freedoms and public goods such as privacy, paradoxically requiring societal resilience, whether precautionary or in mitigation of the harms it causes to the public goods of free societies. This article develops new models and extends existing ones to describe resilience processes unfolding over time and in anticipation of, or in reaction to, adversities of different kinds and severity, and explores resilience both on the plane of abstract analysis and in the context of societal responses to mass surveillance. The article thus focuses upon surveillance as a special field for conceptual analysis and modelling of situations, and for evaluating contemporary developments in "surveillance societies".

Richard Jones, David Wright, Rowena Rodrigues, Charles Raab, et al. 'Questioning surveillance' (2015) Computer Law & Security Review 31(2) 280-292
Abstract: The aim of this article is to make suggestions that could empower different socio-political groups to question surveillance. It does so by formulating sets of questions that different stakeholders can ask of themselves, of the private sector and of government, including intelligence agencies. It is divided into three main parts. The first part provides some background on resilience in surveillance societies. It defines the terms and identifies features of resilience and today's surveillance society. The second part lays out a set of questions addressed to each of the stakeholder groups. The questions are intended to promote consideration of a proposed or existing surveillance system, technology, practice or other initiative in terms of the necessity and proportionality of the system, and of whether stakeholders are being consulted. The third part offers a list of measures that can be taken to increase resilience in a surveillance society, to restrict the scope of surveillance systems to what can be legitimately justified, and to minimise the impacts of surveillance systems on the individual, groups and society.

Richard Jones 'The electronic monitoring of offenders: penal moderation or penal excess?' (2014) Crime, Law and Social Change 62(4) 475-488

Richard Jones 'The Electronic Monitoring of Serious Offenders: Is there a rehabilitative potential?' (2014) Monatsschrift für Kriminologie und Strafrechtsreform Vol 97(1) 85-92
Abstract: Many countries around the world now electronically monitor some convicted offenders to check the offenders' compliance with court orders of different kinds. Although regarded as an intermediate penalty, to date electronic monitoring has not generally been employed for rehabilitative purposes. Electronic monitoring systems have evolved over time, however, and there is the possibility that future technologies and practices could embrace more rehabilitative goals. This article sketches out various currents of change within criminal justice, and suggests how future electronic monitoring schemes might instantiate an emergent 'new rehabilitation'.

Richard Jones 'Towards a Global Criminology?' (2011) Sungkyunkwan Journal of Science & Technology Law Vol 5(1) 33-53
Abstract: The aim of this article is consider the current constitution, and likely future prospects, of the field of criminology, and to examine in particular how it might be becoming more global in nature. The term 'criminology' will be used broadly, referring to the academic field as a whole, and hence including the study of the causes of crime, responses to crime including criminal justice, as well as to the field's many sub-disciplines. The article begins by considering international and comparative criminology, before reviewing previous work that has raised the prospect of a 'global criminology.' The focus then shifts to consideration of the question, 'what is criminology?' It is argued that this question usefully draws attention to certain problems currently facing Anglo-American criminology, and contends moreover that these issues are related in certain respects to issues that will face criminology as it globalises. Drawing from work by Wenger (1999) and others, a novel way of conceptualising the field of criminology is proposed, namely as a group of 'communities of practice.' The article shows how not only does this approach help model some of the challenges facing Anglo- American criminology both domestically and globally, but that it also suggests some practical measures that could be undertaken to help overcome these problems.

Richard Jones 'Populist Leniency, Crime Control and Due Process' (2010) Theoretical Criminology Vol 14(3) 331-347

Richard Jones 'The Architecture of Surveillance' (2007) Criminal Justice Matters 68 33-34

Richard Jones 'Entertaining Code: File Sharing, Digital Rights Management Regimes, and Criminological Theories of Compliance' (2005) International Review of Law, Computers and Technology 19(3) 287-303
Abstract: This article outlines some of the main types of file-sharing systems and summarizes survey findings relating to file-sharing use. Three related theoretical models of compliance seeking through the use of technology are discussed, namely Lessig's (involving 'code' and 'architecture'), Bottoms' (involving 'constraint-based compliance') and Clarke and others' work on 'situational crime prevention', and each is then applied to the specific topic of the illegal and legal distribution of music and films on the Internet.

Richard Jones 'Digital Rule: Punishment, Control and Technology' (2000) Punishment & Society 2(1) 5-22
Abstract: This article develops a theoretical model of 'digital rule'. This is a form of at-a-distance monitoring which becomes possible with the advent of certain electronic technologies. It is argued that this form of monitoring gives rise to a related form of decision-making, and to particular forms of punishment, both directly and indirectly. The article begins with a review of Foucault's work on 'discipline'. It is argued that while his general approach remains useful, his 'technology of power' model requires updating, because of certain moves within many criminal justice systems away from reliance on the disciplinary techniques Foucault associates with modernity. I argue that comments by Deleuze suggest a way of developing a theoretical adjunct to Foucault's model, and this new control form I characterize as one of 'digital rule'. Various emerging electronic technologies are examined, and it is shown how they operate specifically through restrictions specified in terms of time and space. The relationship between formal control, exclusion and punishment measures is considered, and it is concluded that in this emerging form of rule, these aspects continue to have a very close relationship, taking form here in a particular new way.

Chapters

Richard Jones, Richard Sparks 'Introduction' in Richard Jones, Richard Sparks Punishment (Routledge, 2015) Vol. I, pp. 1-17

Richard Jones, Charles Raab 'Good practice in privacy design: some examples' in David Wright and Reinhard Kreissl (eds) Surveillance in Europe (Routledge, 2014) p.293

Richard Jones 'Surveillance and security in a risk society' in Chris Hale, Keith Hayward, Azrini Wahidin and Emma Wincup (eds) Criminology 3rd ed (OUP, 2013) pp. 431-452

Richard Jones 'Digital Rule: Punishment, Control and Technology [Reprint]' in Y. Jewkes (eds) Crime and Media (Sage Library of Criminology) (Sage Publications, 2009) Vol. III

Richard Jones 'Cybercrime and Internet Security' in Charlotte Waelde, Lilian Edwards (eds) Law and the Internet (Hart, 2009) pp.601-621

Richard Jones 'Surveillance' in C. Hale et al. (eds) Criminology (2nd edn) (Oxford University Press, 2009) pp.523-545

Richard Jones 'Checkpoint Security: Gateways, Airports, and the Architecture of Security' in K. Franko Aas, H. Oppen Gundhus, and H. Mork Lomell (eds) Technologies of Insecurity (Routledge-Cavendish, 2008)

Richard Jones 'The Architecture of Policing' in Alistair Henry, David J. Smith Transformations of Policing (Ashgate, 2007) pp.169-190

Richard Jones 'Digital Rule: Punishment, Control and Technology [Reprint]' in Clive Norris and Dean Wilson (eds) Surveillance, Crime and Social Control (International Library of Criminology, Criminal Justice & Penology 2nd Series) (Ashgate, 2006) pp. 519-536
Abstract: This is an attempt to develop a theoretical model of 'digital rule'. This is a form of at-a-distance monitoring which becomes possible with the advent of certain electronic technologies. It is argued that this form of monitoring gives rise to a related form of decision-making, and to particular forms of punishment, both directly and indirectly. The article begins with a review of Foucault's work on 'discipline'. It is argued that while his general approach remains useful, his 'technology of power' model requires updating, because of certain moves within many criminal justice systems away from reliance on the disciplinary techniques Foucault associates with modernity. I argue that comments by Deleuze suggest a way of developing a theoretical adjunct to Foucault's model, and this new control form I characterize as one of 'digital rule'. Various emerging electronic technologies are examined, and it is shown how they operate specifically through restrictions specified in terms of time and space. The relationship between formal control, exclusion and punishment measures is considered, and it is concluded that in this emerging form of rule, these aspects continue to have a very close relationship, taking form here in a particular new way.

Richard Jones ''Architecture', Criminal Justice, and Control' in Lesley McAra, Sarah Armstrong (eds) Perspectives on Punishment: The Contours of Control (Oxford University Press, 2006) pp. 175-196

Richard Jones 'Surveillance' in Hale et al. (eds) Criminology (Oxford University Press, 2005) pp.471-492

Richard Jones 'The Subject of Surveillance' in R. Lippens (eds) Imaginary Boundaries of Justice: Social and Legal Justice Across Disciplines (Hart Publishing, 2004) pp. 117-140

Reports

Richard Jones, et al. [members of the IRISS Consortium] Handbook on Increasing Resilience in a Surveillance Society (IRISS Project: EC Grant Agreement No. 290492, 2014) [Download]

Notes and Reviews

Richard Jones 'Review - Digital Evidence and Computer Crime - Crime in the Digital Age' (2003) International Journal of Law and Information Technology 11(1) 98-100

Richard Jones 'Review - The Culture of Control' (2002) Punishment & Society 4(2) 256-258

Richard Jones 'Review - Imagining Crime' (1997) Theoretical Criminology 1(1) 139-141

Papers and Presentations

Richard Jones 'Police Body-worn Video Cameras and the New Mobile Surveillance' presented at Law and Society Association Annual Meeting, Seattle, USA, 2015
Abstract: Police forces around the world are trialling the use of body-worn cameras by officers. Such cameras permit close-up recording of police-public interactions from the officers' points of view, which may influence these interactions. Roll-out of the cameras is costly, but little is yet known as to their utility or wider effects. There may therefore be parallels with the introduction of fixed CCTV cameras. The paper discusses this emergent policing technology, and summarises current trials and usage before reviewing evaluations of the technology conducted to date. Privacy and policing concerns are highlighted, and the cameras' introduction is situated within the rise of consumer born-worn cameras, of scrutiny of the police by citizens' cell phone cameras, and indeed of visual 'ubiquitous surveillance' more generally. Such cameras appear part of managerial strategies to implement mobile technology and influence police practice, but may run up against prevailing police practices, culture, and use of discretion. The paper argues that a confluence of technical, economic, political and popular-cultural factors underlie such cameras' adoption by police forces; and that 'first person' mobile surveillance represents a new departure in the securitisation of public and private space.

Richard Jones 'The Legitimacy of 'High Policing': Trust, 'Political' Surveillance and Procedural Justice' presented at Workshop on Trust, Distrust and Surveillance, Gothenburg, Sweden, 2015

Richard Jones 'Police Body-Worn Video Cameras, Security, and the New Mobile Surveillance' presented at European Society of Criminology, 15th Annual Conference, Porto, 2015
Abstract: Police forces around the world are trialling the use of body-worn video (BWV) cameras by officers. Such cameras permit close-up recording of police-public interactions from the officers' points of view, which may influence these interactions. Roll-out of the cameras is costly, but little is yet known as to their utility or wider effects. There may therefore be parallels with the introduction of fixed CCTV cameras. The paper discusses this emergent policing technology, and summarises current trials and usage before reviewing evaluations of the technology conducted to date. Privacy and policing concerns are highlighted, and the cameras' introduction is situated within the rise of consumer born-worn cameras, of scrutiny of the police by citizens' cell phone cameras, and indeed of visual 'ubiquitous surveillance' more generally. Such cameras appear part of managerial strategies to implement mobile technology and influence police practice, but may run up against prevailing police practices, culture, and use of discretion. The paper argues that a confluence of technical, economic, political and popular-cultural factors underlie such cameras' adoption by police forces; and that 'first person' mobile surveillance represents a new departure in the securitisation of public and private space.

Richard Jones, Charles Raab and Ivan Szekely 'Resilience: Theory and Practice in a Surveillance Society' presented at Workshop on Political Action, Resilience and Solidarity, King's College London, 2014

Richard Jones 'The electronic monitoring of offenders: penal moderation or penal excess?' presented at European Society of Criminology, 14th Annual Conference, Prague, 2014

Richard Jones, Charles Raab and Iván Székely 'Taking 'Resilience' Seriously: Exploring its Implications in the Surveillance Context' presented at Surveillance and Society Conference, Barcelona, 2014
Abstract: For a later version of this same paper, please see our paper on SSRN entitled 'Surveillance and Resilience': http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2645973

Richard Jones 'The Affective Dimension of Surveillance' presented at Surveillance and Society Conference, Barcelona, 2014

Richard Jones '(Invited paper) Modelling institutional continuity and change in criminal justice and crime control' presented at British Society of Criminology Yorkshire and Humberside Branch Seminar, Leeds, 2014

Richard Jones, Charles Raab 'Societal 'Resilience' to Mass Surveillance in the Post-Snowden Era' presented at Doctoral School, Faculty of Law, Eötvös Loránd University (ELTE), Budapest, Hungary, 2014
Abstract: The recent Snowden revelations about the massive communications surveillance carried out by the intelligence services in the USA and the UK have had a dramatic effect on the perception of people in, and far beyond, those countries. They now understand the power of such surveillance to shape political and social life, whether or not the security aims of combating terrorism and crime are achieved. The term 'surveillance society' is increasingly used in public debate, involving the question of what can be done to resist or respond resiliently to the challenge of surveillance in the digital age. This is because surveillance, introduced in name of greater security, may ironically itself reduce other social freedoms. But how are individuals and societies to go about responding to such developments in order to keep surveillance, including future unknown developments, in check? Spontaneous 'resistance' campaigns and demonstrations can be highly effective, yet are reactive, ad hoc, and seem an uncertain way to control state activity. This paper explores how the concept of 'resilience' might offer a more systematic way of understanding both the dangers posed by mass surveillance and the strategies that could be adopted in order better to protect societies from its threat. Whereas the concept of 'resilience' is a contested term and sometimes regarded as part of neo-liberal securitisation strategy, we show how its meaning is contextual, and how it can be re-appropriated in order to mitigate the harms caused by surveillance to the public goods of free societies, including privacy.

Richard Jones 'A Theory of Criminological Theories' presented at Criminological Theory Group Seminar Series, Edinburgh Law School, 2013

Richard Jones 'Agenda-framing and the constitution of the tenable and untenable in penal policy' presented at What is Justice?: Re-imagining penal policy, Keble College, Oxford, 2013

Richard Jones 'Agenda-framing and the constitution of the tenable and untenable in penal policy' presented at European Society of Criminology, 13th Annual Conference, Budapest, 2013

Richard Jones '(Invited paper) The promises of electronic monitoring in controlling dangerous offenders: Is there a rehabilitative potential?' presented at Developing sexual offender law and treatment in Europe: Political and legal trends and new paths in treatment strategies for sexual offenders, Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law, Freiburg, Germany, 2013

Richard Jones 'Electronic Self-Monitoring by Offenders: A Model of a Possible Future Rehabilitative Approach' presented at American Society of Criminology, Washington, D.C., 2011
Abstract: The electronic monitoring of offenders is usually achieved by means of a device securely attached to an offender's body, monitoring the offender's location in order to check compliance with a home detention, attendance or exclusion order. A new generation of electronic 'tags' features alcohol and drug sensing. Advantages of electronic monitoring include that it is immediate and continual, and may support rehabilitation. Disadvantages include that the compliance obtained may be instrumental and of limited long-term rehabilitative effect. However, there are theoretical reasons for supposing that electronic monitoring technologies, used differently, could have greater rehabilitative potential. DiClemente and colleagues suggest that feedback, especially of a highly personalised kind, may play an important role in promoting health (and especially addictive) behaviour change. Electronic monitoring technologies make possible personalised immediate feedback of locational and biometric data, and could in theory be used for offender self-monitoring; elective as well as imposed surveillance; and the transmission of results to community networks (facilitating group support and control mechanisms). This paper suggests how such technologies might assist desistance from offending; locates them within the context of wider penal-welfare transformations; and considers some implications for the areas of desistance and compliance research, situational action theory, and surveillance studies.

Richard Jones 'Towards a Global Criminology' presented at 'Legal Exchange and Cooperation between Korea and the EU' (SKKU BK21 Glocal Science and Technology Law Program), SungKyunKwan University, Seoul, South Korea, 2011

Richard Jones 'Some remarks about What is Criminology?: Talk to mark the launch of Bosworth and Hoyle (eds), What is Criminology? (Oxford University Press)' presented at All Souls Criminology Seminar Series, Oxford, 2011
Abstract: Click to download an SSRN paper entitled 'Towards a Global Criminology?', which incorporates part of Richard Jones's All Souls talk, including a discussion of how one can think of criminology as 'communities of practice' in Etienne Wenger's sense.

Richard Jones 'Digital Rule Redux: Surveillance, security and technology' presented at Research Seminar Series, School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research, University of Kent, Canterbury, 2011

Richard Jones 'Social networking technologies, community engagement and policing' presented at Edinburgh Policing Research and Practice Group, Fettes Police Headquarters, Edinburgh, 2011
Abstract: This session aims to open up a dialogue about the ways in which social networking technologies might be used by the police. It outlines the nature of the technologies themselves and reviews some of the ways in which police forces have, thus far, attempted to deploy them. In so doing it presents some of the potential benefits of using social networking technologies, as well as some of the challenges and possible pitfalls.

Richard Jones 'Populist punitiveness, populist leniency, and Packer's 'crime control' model' presented at Reinventing Penal Parsimony: International Workshop, All Souls College, Oxford, 2010

Richard Jones 'Techniques of Social Control in Crime Control and Criminal Justice' presented at Lunchtime Seminar Series, Centre for Criminology, University of Oxford, 2010

Richard Jones ''Architecture', control and freedom' presented at Panopticons? Compliance, urban space and contemporary design, University of Edinburgh, 2010

Richard Jones 'Crime Prevention and the Problem of Manipulation' presented at American Society of Criminology, San Francisco, 2010

Richard Jones 'Security Theatre' presented at Convention on Modern Liberty, Glasgow, 2009

Richard Jones 'Techniques of Social Control in Criminal Justice and Crime Control' presented at Centre for Law and Society Seminar Series, Edinburgh, 2009

Richard Jones 'Architectures of Security: Constraint-based compliance and airport security' presented at European Society of Criminology Conference, Ljubljana, Slovenia, 2009

Richard Jones 'CyberTags: The third generation of electronic offender-monitoring systems' presented at Gikii 4, Institute for Information Law, Amsterdam, 2009

Richard Jones 'Through Another's Eyes: From 'Third Person' to 'First Person' Surveillance' presented at GikIII, Oxford, 2008

Richard Jones 'Back to Packer: Rethinking Criminal Justice Crises, Penal Populism, and the Culture of Control' presented at Criminal Justice in Crisis?, Aberdeen, 2008

Richard Jones 'Architectures of Security: Developing a theoretical model of the role of constraint-based compliance in airport security' presented at Technologies of (in)security, Oslo, Norway, 2007

Richard Jones 'Criminological theories of compliance, and corporate crime' presented at Workshop on 'Corporate Crime Control, Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility', Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan, 2007

Richard Jones 'Visualising Surveillance' presented at British Criminology Conference, LSE, London, 2007

Richard Jones 'Invisible Surveillance' presented at British Criminology Conference, Glasgow, 2006

Richard Jones 'Populist punitiveness and the role of the mass media' presented at Law and Visual Culture, Barcelona, 2006

Richard Jones 'Spies, Slaves, and Cyborgs: The Technologies, Architectures and Cultural Meanings of Electronic 'Tags'' presented at GikII Workshop, Edinburgh, 2006

Richard Jones 'Risk, populist punitiveness and catastrophic offending' presented at Law, Probability and Risk: Penal Justice I, International Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Edinburgh, 2004

Richard Jones 'Who regulates cyberspace?' presented at Intersections seminar, Julius Stone Institute, Law School, University of Sydney, 2004

Richard Jones 'The scientification of police work' presented at Reflections Twenty Years After Police and People in London, Centre for Law and Society, University of Edinburgh, 2004

Richard Jones 'Towards a revised model of Code and social regulation' presented at Lefis Lessig Workshop, Belfast, 2004

Richard Jones 'Populist punitiveness and the politics of criminal justice' presented at Seminar at Faculty of Law, University of Sydney, 2004

Richard Jones ''Architecture', Social Regulation, and Situational Punishment' presented at Scottish Criminology Conference, 2003
Abstract: This paper begins by locating certain aspects of punishment within a wider category of social regulation. It then seeks to develop a general model of modes of social regulation by drawing from, and developing, a framework devised by Lessig for understanding the limits of legal attempts to regulate the Internet. Particular attention is paid to Lessig's notion of 'architecture' as a mode of regulation. The paper then goes on to apply the resulting model to the field of punishment, showing in particular how it helps reveal certain fundamental characteristics of punitive technology.

Richard Jones 'The Subject of Surveillance: Criminology and Film Theory' presented at Onati Int Instit for Sociol of Law: Workshop: 'Imaginary Boundaries', 2002

Richard Jones 'The Commodification of Punishment' presented at Law and Society Association, Budapest, 2001

Richard Jones 'Bourdieu, 'distinction', and criminal justice' presented at Scottish Criminology Conference, Edinburgh, 2000

Richard Jones 'Digital technologies, surveillance, and social control' presented at Surveillance and Society, Hull, 2000

Richard Jones 'The electronic monitoring of offenders' presented at Seminar, Department of Applied Social Science, Lancaster University, 2000

Richard Jones 'On Digital Rule: Punishment, control and technology' presented at American Society of Criminology, Toronto, 1999