Lecturer in Digital Media & IT Law

PhD in International Law and Economics (Bocconi University, Italy); LLM in Public Law (UCL); Combined Bachelor's and Master's Degree in Law (University of Pavia, Italy)
View my full research profile

  • Tel: +44 (0)131 650 6957
  • Email: Paolo.Cavaliere@ed.ac.uk
  • Office and Feedback Hours for current students:
    Thursdays, 15.00-16.00 and appointments at other times can be arranged by email.
    (David Hume Tower, 10th floor, room #8)

Biography

I joined the University of Edinburgh Law School in September 2014 as a lecturer in Digital Media & IT Law.

Prior to joining the University of Edinburgh, I have been a researcher at the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policies of the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies of the University of Oxford where I also helped to coordinate the Monroe Price Media Law Moot Court Competition.

I am currently a member of SCRIPT, a law and technology research centre based in the School of Law within the University of Edinburgh, a research associate at the University of Oxford’s Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy and a non-resident research fellow of the Central European University’s Center for Media, Data and Society. 

Further to my academic activity, I have provided expertise on telecommunications and media law to a range of NGOs and international organisations, including the African Union's Mission to Somalia and the Council of Europe among others.

I received my Ph.D. in International Law & Economics from Bocconi University of Milan. My doctoral dissertation focused on the issue of pluralism and diversification of information in the European landscape of news media, combining a survey on media law and policy in a comparative perspective with elements of economic analysis and public choice theory. I also holds a laurea in Law from the University of Pavia and an LL.M. in Public Law from University College, London. I completed my law apprenticeship and was admitted to the Bar in Italy.

Ph.D. supervision interests
Freedom of expression Media law and regulation Communications / IT law and regulation

Teaching

I regularly teach a range of courses focusing on freedom of expression, the regulation of the media and communications industries and online business, including:

  • Freedom of Expression Law Clinic (Hons.) (Course organiser)
  • Communications, Networks and the Law (LLM) (Course organiser)
  • The Law of E-commerce (LLM) (Course organiser)
  • International and European Media Law (LLM)
  • Communications Law (ODL LLM) (Course organiser)
  • Electronic Commerce Law (ODL LLM) (Course organiser)
  • International and European Media Law (ODL LLM) (Course organiser) 

Visiting and Research Positions

  • Research associate, Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy, University of Oxford (2014- present)
  • Non-Resident Fellow, Center for Media, Data and Society, Central European University (Budapest, Hungary) (2013-present)

Biography

I joined the University of Edinburgh Law School in September 2014 as a lecturer in Digital Media & IT Law.

Prior to joining the University of Edinburgh, I have been a researcher at the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policies of the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies of the University of Oxford where I also helped to coordinate the Monroe Price Media Law Moot Court Competition.

I am currently a member of SCRIPT, a law and technology research centre based in the School of Law within the University of Edinburgh, a research associate at the University of Oxford’s Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy and a non-resident research fellow of the Central European University’s Center for Media, Data and Society. 

Further to my academic activity, I have provided expertise on telecommunications and media law to a range of NGOs and international organisations, including the African Union's Mission to Somalia and the Council of Europe among others.

I received my Ph.D. in International Law & Economics from Bocconi University of Milan. My doctoral dissertation focused on the issue of pluralism and diversification of information in the European landscape of news media, combining a survey on media law and policy in a comparative perspective with elements of economic analysis and public choice theory. I also holds a laurea in Law from the University of Pavia and an LL.M. in Public Law from University College, London. I completed my law apprenticeship and was admitted to the Bar in Italy.

PhD Supervisees

Thomas Broderick  'Examining the need for legal regulation of data-driven and digital journalism'

Wenlong Li  'Privacy, Data Protection and Big Data: A comparative study of data privacy protection in the big data practices between EU and China'

Hashim Mude  'Critical reporting or fanning the flames of intolerance? The media's coverage and framing of the 'refugee crisis' in Europe: A comparative study of the reporting in Germany, Greece and Hungary.'

Michael Russ  'Is it conceptually desirable and practically feasible to regulate social media and user-generated information providers?'

Books and Reports

Kristina Irion, Paolo Cavaliere, Darian Pavli, Comparative study of best European practices of online content regulation: Law and policy of online content regulation, in particular defamation online, in the light of Albanian legislative proposals, (Council of Europe, 2015)

Articles

Paolo Cavaliere, 'The pursuit of happiness reloaded: From measures to policymaking, holistic well-being as a global political goal in contemporary constitutionalism', (2015), The Journal of Legal Pluralism and Unofficial Law, Vol 47, pp 56-75
Abstract: The rise of a number of initiatives, at both the national and supranational levels, to go beyond economic metrics of societal progress such as the gross domestic production is sparking a growing interest worldwide. Such a shift would generate a number of effects on the policymaking process and traditional strategic narratives about the interplay between community and society, the functioning of the public debate and the roles of civil society, government and the state at large. Introducing indicators of holistic quality of life would impact the policymaking process and require to abandon the current “rational-instrumental” model of policymaking in favour of the alternative “constructivist” or “interactionist” models. Furthermore, this would shake the very foundations of Western constitutionalism by challenging consolidated assumptions of what are considered to be the traditional aims and responsibilities of a state, the functioning of the media sphere and the public debate, and eventually raising a case for redistributing the political power between governments and social groups of different sorts.

Paolo Cavaliere, 'An Easter egg in the Charter of fundamental rights: The European Union and the rising right to pluralism', (2012), International Journal of Public Law and Policy, Vol 2, pp 357-396
Abstract: Article 11 of the European Charter of Fundamental Rights contains an ambiguous reference to the value of pluralism. Such an unusual acknowledgment in a 'bill of rights' is likely to clear the way for a judicial enforcement of a 'right to pluralism' in the near future, as the European Court of Justice and the European Court of Human Rights already show signs of an evolutionary trend in this direction. The frictions between this judicial trend and the recent EU communication policies aimed at building up a European identity and public sphere might cause conflicting rationales and aims to clash.

Chapters

Paolo Cavaliere, 'Measuring government performance and happiness The end of public opinion as we know it?' in Julie Bouchard, Etienne Candel, Helene Cardy, Gustavo Gomez-Mejia (ed.) La Médiatisation de L’évaluation / Evaluation in the Media (Peter Lang 2015) 149-171
Abstract: In the latest years a number of initiatives of national or international scope are challenging the suitability of Gross Domestic Production measures as the main indicator of societal wellbeing and proposing to shift the focus of measurement systems away from economic production to people’s holistic wellbeing. Such a change would have a strong impact on the formation of public opinion, for it would shift the ground of the public political discourse, from highly technical (and obscure to most ordinary citizens) indicators like economic statistics to issues that people directly experience in their lives. This would have the potential to support the deliberative process by allowing a more widespread and conscious participation. As a result, the public sphere could be rethought as a multiplicity of assorted public micro-spheres where varied social groups, depending on their interests and needs, could gather and develop diverse and independent evaluations concerning government performance and policies in various areas of action. In the meanwhile, the advent of a similar change in the shape of the public debate could eventually raise challenges of disgregation of audiences and society, and indicate a need to retune some traditional features of the role and the functioning of mass media like objectivity, journalistic professionalism and detachment and the role of statistics as authoritative measurements.