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Professor Alexandra Braun

Prof Alexandra Braun
Lord President Reid Chair of Law

Director of Research

Tel: +44 (0)131 651 5560

Email: Alexandra.Braun@ed.ac.uk

View my full research profile

Alexandra Braun holds the Lord President Reid Chair in Law at the University of Edinburgh.

Professor Braun completed her undergraduate degree at the University of Genoa and received a PhD in Comparative Private Law from the University of Trento. Prior to joining Edinburgh Law School, Professor Braun was Professor of Comparative Private Law at the University of Oxford, as well as a Fellow and Tutor in Law at Lady Margaret Hall. Professor Braun is a Visiting Research Fellow at the Institute of European and Comparative Law in Oxford and an Honorary Research Fellow at Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford. She is also an elected Associate Member of the International Academy of Comparative Law.

Professor Braun is the Director of Research and Knowledge Exchange at Edinburgh Law School, and Programme Director of the LLM in Comparative and European Private Law. She is also a Member of the Steering Committee of the Edinburgh Centre for Private Law and the Series Editor of the Edinburgh Studies in Law series published by Edinburgh University Press.

Professor Braun has broad research interests in comparative law and legal history. Her current research focuses primarily on the comparative study of both succession law and the law of trusts, as well as on the study of the circulation of legal ideas across legal traditions.

Professor Braun is in the process of completing a monograph that provides a comparative study of broken promises of an inheritance, to be published with Oxford University Press.

Professor Braun is also interested in the impact of the transfer of wealth on questions of intergenerational equality and the cultural history of inheritance. Other interests include legal education, the study of the intellectual history of the law, and the development of various forms of legal scholarship and its interaction with, and impact upon, judicial decision-making.