MSc in Global Crime, Justice and Security

Programme Overview

The MSc in Global Crime, Justice and Security integrates teaching in the School of Social and Political Science and the School of Law at the University of Edinburgh. Like all University of Edinburgh Masters programmes, the degree is fully Bologna compatible, and is recognised across Europe and beyond under the principles of the Bologna framework. 

The university believes that this degree is timely in light of the criminogenic potential of increased flows of goods, money and people, increased international cooperation in the field of crime control, increasing institutionalisation of international responses to state crimes, and emerging discourses focused on insecurity.  The programme draws on strengths within two different Schools to create an advanced programme that is more than the sum of its parts, and that seeks to address the changing role of state and law in a global context.

What our students say 

Josef Budde studied the MSc in Global Crime, Justice and Security in the 2016-17 academic year, graduating in 2017.


Josef talks about his experience of studying for the MSc.

Programme Aims

This MSc is designed to equip students with an advanced, cross-disciplinary knowledge of the legal, political and policy issues in relation to crime, justice and security in a global context.  The programme enables students to analyse and evaluate alternative explanations for international and transnational developments in crime and responses to crime.

More specifically, the programme aims to do the following:

  • provide students with a recognised, advanced level exit qualification equipping them for work in a variety of policy-relevant positions, relevant legal institutions or further advanced level study;
  • to foster an in-depth understanding of relevant theoretical approaches and associated concepts in the study of crime, justice and security in a global context;
  • to encourage openness to different scholarly approaches within law and social and political science to questions of crime, justice and security in a global context;
  • to provide students with the academic skills required to analyse the activity of domestic courts and government, international and supranational legal and political institutions and NGOs in the field of crime, justice and security;
  • to provide students with critical skills for the analysis of law and policy in the field of global crime, justice and security;
  • to give students an understanding of the origins of policy in the field of crime, justice and security and of the factors shaping its development.