AQMeN Research Fellow in Criminology

LLB (Hons), Dip LP, MSc, PhD
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Biography

Ellie Bates is a Research Fellow in Criminology. She works with the Applied Quantitative Methods Network (AQMeN) as part of the Crime and Victimisation research team. Currently she is focusing on analysis of local and regional crime trends and Scotland's crime drop.

Ellie has an MSc in Geographical Information Science (GIS) and Society and a PhD in Criminology from the University of Edinburgh. Prior to returning to full time study and completing her MSc and PhD, Ellie worked in the not-for-profit and public sector, most recently, as a research officer in local government.

Ellie's broad research interests are crime and place, crime trajectories, geo-visualisation and exploratory spatial data analysis (ESDA). Ellie is interested in critically and reflexively combining research approaches from geography, geographical information science (GIS) and criminology. She has a particular interest in advanced methods in quantitative criminology and mixed methods using particpatory GIS approaches.

Her doctoral thesis: “Vandalism: a crime of place” considered why there are high and low levels of vandalism in different urban places year in and year out taking a multidisciplinary and mixed method approach. The research made extensive use of mapping, visualisation and spatial analysis techniques, in particular Local Moran's I and Gi* (Local Indicators of Spatial Association - LISA) to highlight places where there were consistently high and low levels of vandalism over a six year period. This was complemented by group trajectory analysis and use of focus groups.

Ellie is developing research into low crime places and what makes places safe and percieved as safe from crime.

Biography

Ellie Bates is a Research Fellow in Criminology. She works with the Applied Quantitative Methods Network (AQMeN) as part of the Crime and Victimisation research team. Currently she is focusing on analysis of local and regional crime trends and Scotland's crime drop.

Ellie has an MSc in Geographical Information Science (GIS) and Society and a PhD in Criminology from the University of Edinburgh. Prior to returning to full time study and completing her MSc and PhD, Ellie worked in the not-for-profit and public sector, most recently, as a research officer in local government.

Ellie's broad research interests are crime and place, crime trajectories, geo-visualisation and exploratory spatial data analysis (ESDA). Ellie is interested in critically and reflexively combining research approaches from geography, geographical information science (GIS) and criminology. She has a particular interest in advanced methods in quantitative criminology and mixed methods using particpatory GIS approaches.

Her doctoral thesis: “Vandalism: a crime of place” considered why there are high and low levels of vandalism in different urban places year in and year out taking a multidisciplinary and mixed method approach. The research made extensive use of mapping, visualisation and spatial analysis techniques, in particular Local Moran's I and Gi* (Local Indicators of Spatial Association - LISA) to highlight places where there were consistently high and low levels of vandalism over a six year period. This was complemented by group trajectory analysis and use of focus groups.

Ellie is developing research into low crime places and what makes places safe and percieved as safe from crime.

Courses Taught

Criminology (Honours)

Books and Reports

Laura Robertson, Ellie Bates, Scottish Crime and Justice Survey 2012/13: Drug Use, (Scottish Government, 2014)

Articles

Jon Bannister, Anthony O'Sullivan, Eleanor Bates, 'Place and time in the criminology of place ', (2017), Theoretical Criminology, pp 1-18
Abstract: This article evaluates developments in the ecological analysis of crime, which have found their most recent expression in a Criminology of Place. We argue that theoretical and methodological deficiencies are evident in the Criminology of Place and associated literatures with respect to their underlying treatment of place, time and causation. Big Data holds promise for helping address these shortfalls, but dangers also. The successful advance of the Criminology of Place requires elevating the why question to equal status with those of where and what in the analysis of crime. Ultimately, the paper positions the progress towards and prospects for a multi-scalar and time sensitive theoretical and empirical model of the Criminology of Place.

Jon Bannister, Eleanor Bates, Kearns Ade, 'Local variance in the crime drop: A longitudinal study of neighbourhoods in greater Glasgow, Scotland', (2017), British Journal of Criminology, pp 1-23
Abstract: This paper reports on a novel longitudinal study of local variation in the decline of recorded crime in Greater Glasgow, United Kingdom. We deploy group trajectory analysis (exploring spatial autocorrelation with Local Moran’s I) and comparison of means to explore the underlying characteristics and trajectories of neighbourhoods over time. The research finds marked distinction in the level of crime and trajectories of different neighbourhood crime groups. Neighbourhood crime trajectories with high or low levels of crime exhibit spatial clustering and significant distinction in their characteristics. There is more limited spatial patterning, though still clear distinction between the characteristics of neighbourhood crime groups that exhibit different crime trajectories. We consider the research and policy implications of these findings.

Eleanor Bates, 'Does place matter? ', (2015), Scottish Justice Matters, Vol 3, pp 8

Chapters

Eleanor Bates, William Mackaness, 'Understanding Spatio-Temporal Patterns of Crime Using Hotspot AND Coldspot Analysis ' in Proceedings of GISRUK, University of Leeds ( 2015)
Abstract: This paper argues that we need to think as much about where crime does not happen as where it does. The use of hotspot maps is a widely accepted practice in policing, These maps highlight areas with high concentrations of crime but tell us less about areas with medium or low concentrations of crime. Understanding what makes a ‘low crime place’ may provide lessons for reducing crime. This paper proposes techniques which use a mixed method approach, combining LISA, Group Trajectory Analysis and Focus Groups, to give us a more nuanced and detailed understanding of crime at the neighbourhood level.

Working Papers

Eleanor Bates, 'Crime hotspots ' 2017

Ellie Bates, Jon Bannister, Kearns Ade, 'Local variance in the crime drop: Are there winners and losers?' 2014