Edinburgh Study findings used as part of evidence base for two campaigns in the UK and Ireland

Research findings from the Edinburgh Study of Youth Transitions and Crime (ESYTC), a research centre based at Edinburgh Law School, have recently formed part of the evidence base for two campaigns in the UK and Ireland.

Research findings from the Edinburgh Study of Youth Transitions and Crime (ESYTC), a research centre based at Edinburgh Law School, have recently formed part of the evidence base for two campaigns in the UK and Ireland.

The Irish Penal Reform Trust, Barnardos and the Irish Association of Young People in care, have utilised ESYTC findings (based on an article by Professors Lesley McAra and Susan McVie*), as part of their campaign shift in resources from criminal justice to social justice, thereby creating better communities and a safer society for all. Professor McAra recently spoke at a conference in Dublin, attended by leading academics, policy makers, politicians and practitioners, which marked the official launch of the campaign. Referencing the ESYTC research, the campaign report states: "As research now shows, rather than targeting those 'at risk', universal supports that underpin social justice are more likely to have positive effect".

Similarly, Barnardos (England/Wales) have also used Edinburgh Study findings (in the form of a different McAra and McVie** article) in a campaign which calls for a raising of the age of criminal responsibility in England and Wales. The campaign states that, "Detailed longitudinal research involving a cohort of 4,100 children in Scotland, concluded that the deeper that children penetrate the youth justice system, the more 'damaged' they are likely to become and the less likely they are to stop offending and grow out of crime."

Details of the Irish Penal Trust, Barnardos and the Irish Association of Young People in Care Campaign

Details of the Barnardos (England/Wales) Campaign

Read more about the Edinburgh Study of Youth Transitions and Crime

Academic Profile: Professor Lesley McAra

Academic Profile: Professor Susan McVie

 

Articles cited:

*McAra and McVie, 'Youth Crime and Justice: Key Messages from the Edinburgh
Study of Youth Transitions and Crime' (2010) Criminology and Criminal
Justice 10: 211-230

**McAra and McVie 'Youth Justice? The Impact of System Contact on Patterns
of Desistance from Offending' (2007) European Journal of Criminology 4 (3)
315-345