Latest Blog Postings

Forty years in, forty years out

Tamara Hervey, Jean Monnet Professor of EU Law, University of Sheffield The EU affects virtually every aspect of the UK’s health laws and policies.  NHS staffing, integrated health care on the island of Ireland, cross-border healthcare for travellers, retired UK nationals in Spain, pharmaceutical and devices supply chains, human tissue and organ safety, research data …

Published on 28th December 2018

Legal History and Empires, University of the West Indies

Between 11 and 13 July, 2018, the University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus, Barbados, hosted an intentional Conference entitled: “Legal History and Empires: Perspectives from the Colonised”. It followed on from a conference at Singapore devoted to “Legal … Continue reading →

Published on 21st December 2018

The Matter of Slavery

Cross-institutional collaborations can be very fruitful. The first workshop of “The Matter of Slavery in Scotland”–a collaboration between Professor Nuala Zahedieh of the University of Edinburgh, and Dr Sarah Laurenson of the National Museums of Scotland–was was held on Friday … Continue reading →

Published on 10th December 2018

John Millar, his Russian Pupils, and the founding of the Moscow University Law School

As many readers of this blog will know, this blogger has had a long-standing interest in the work of John Millar, Regius Professor of Civil Law in the University of Glasgow from 1761-1801. In exploring aspects of Millar’s development of … Continue reading →

Published on 6th December 2018

Eighteenth-Century Session Papers & Hairdressers and Barbers

An earlier blog post – “Adam Smith and a Close Shave” – introduced the litigation of the Barbers of Edinburgh v. The Hairdressers of Edinburgh. and discussed a spoof or possible genuine Session Paper. Your blogger has discussed this with … Continue reading →

Published on 6th December 2018

The Erosion of the Civilian

A guest post by Nicola Perugini and Neve Gordon.  On the 16th of November 2018, speakers from different parts of the world and different backgrounds—academics, human rights and humanitarian practitioners, policy makers, and investigative journalists—interrogated and debated the status of civilians … Continue reading →

Published on 3rd December 2018

Off the Record: Unlawful Influence on the War Crimes Proceedings

This is the second post in a blog series by Dr Kasey McCall-Smith examines some of the crucial legal issues and broader public questions raised regarding the US v. Khalid Shaikh Mohammad, et. al. military commission proceedings against the five men … Continue reading →

Published on 1st December 2018

Off the Record: Observations on the 9/11 Military Commission

This blog series by Dr Kasey McCall-Smith examines some of the crucial legal issues and broader public questions raised regarding the US v. Khalid Shaikh Mohammad, et. al. military commission proceedings against the five men charged with various war crimes and … Continue reading →

Published on 28th November 2018

Peacebuilding and Syria: What Hope?

Between 13-15 October 2018, the Global Justice Academy co-hosted a weekend of events joining Relief & Reconciliation for Syria with peacebuilding communities in Scotland. This post from Dr George R. Wilkes, reflects on the series of events that took place. … Continue reading →

Published on 20th November 2018

Philippe Sands on the Making of Modern Human Rights

Guncha Sharma is a candidate for the Global Justice Academy’s LLM in Human Rights, and a GJA Student Ambassador for 2018-19. From India, she is also one of three recipientsof the GJA’s LLM Human Rights scholarship awards for this year, … Continue reading →

Published on 13th November 2018